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Our Book

Educating Harlem: A Century of Schooling and Resistance in a Black Community. 

 
The result of independent research and extensive scholarly collaboration, our edited volume on the history of education in 20th century Harlem will be published by columbia University Press in 2019

Edited by Ansley T. Erickson, Teachers College, Columbia University and Ernest Morrell, University of Notre Dame

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Introduction, by Ansley T. Erickson, Teachers College, Columbia University and Ernest Morrell, University of Notre Dame

Part I – Debating What and How Harlem Students Learn in the Long Harlem Renaissance

Chapter 1: Schooling the New Negro: Progressive Education, Black Modernity and the Long Harlem Renaissance, by Daniel Perlstein, University of California, Berkeley

Chapter 2:  “A Serious Pedagogical Situation”: Diverging School Reform Priorities in Depression-Era Harlem, by Thomas Harbison, Independent Scholar

Chapter 3: Wadleigh High School: The Price of Segregation, by Kimberley Johnson, New York University

Part II: Organizing, Writing, and Teaching for Reform in the 1930s through 1950s

Chapter 4: Cinema for Social Change: The Human Relations Film Series of the Harlem Committee of the Teachers Union, 1936-1950, by Lisa Rabin, George Mason University, and Craig Kridel, University of South Carolina

Chapter 5: Bringing Harlem to the Schools: Langston Hughes’ The First Book of Negroes and Crafting a Juvenile Readership, by Jonna Perrillo, University of Texas, El Paso

Chapter 6: Harlem Schools and the New York City Teachers Union, by Clarence Taylor, Baruch College, City University of New York

Part III: Divergent Educational Visions in the Activist 1960s and 1970s

Chapter 7: HARYOU: An Apprenticeship for Young Leaders, by Ansley T. Erickson, Teachers College, Columbia University

Chapter 8: I.S. 201: Space, Race, and Modern Architecture in Harlem, by Marta Gutman, City College, City University of New York

Chapter 9: Black Power as Educational Renaissance: The Harlem Landscape, by Russell Rickford, Cornell University

Chapter 10: “Harlem Sophistication” Reimagining the Work of Education in Central Harlem and East Harlem, by Nick Juravich, New-York Historical Society

Part IV: Post-Civil Rights Setbacks and Structural Alternatives to Public Schooling

Chapter 11: Harlem Schools in the Fiscal Crisis, by Kim Phillips-Fein, New York University and Esther Cyna, Teachers College, Columbia University

Chapter 12: Pursuing "Real Power to Parents": Babette Edwards' Activism from Community Control to Charter Schools, by Brittney Lewer, New York University

Chapter 13: Teaching Harlem: Black Teachers and the Changing Educational Landscape of Twenty-first Century Central Harlem, by Bethany L. Rogers, College of Staten Island, City University of New York and Terrenda C. White, University of Colorado

Conclusion, by Ernest Morrell, University of Notre Dame and Ansley T. Erickson, Teachers College, Columbia University